Book Review: Duende, a Journey in Search of Flamenco

This is my first review of books set in Spain: Duende, a journey in search of flamenco by Jason Webster. For me, reading a book is not only about being entertained, or inspired, but also about the memories around the book itself.

duende

Not the official cover, but a damn good photo.
By alfanui

I first came across this excellent travelogue biography when I entered a second-hand book shop in Vejer de la Frontera while on a short holiday with my wife. It was a cosy little shop, full of books stacked in handmade pine bookcases and scattered over various tables. The red cover with a drawing of a flamenco dancer stuck out, so I picked it up and scanned the back.

“I found his descriptions of the flamenco underworld irresistible…I couldn’t put it down” Chris Stewart, author of Driving Over Lemons.

As a fan of Chris, I was drawn in immediately.

“A great account of a man’s attempt to learn flamenco,” said the bookshop owner. I turned and smiled as he peered down his nose over his glasses.

“Yeah? I’m looking for some books about flamenco, I’m thinking of writing a novel,” I replied.

“Well, that’s as good as any. I’m not entirely sure that everything happened, but it’s a great story and full of information about flamenco, if that’s what you’re after.”

I didn’t actually buy the book that day, but I kept a mental note of it and put it at the top of my Christmas book list.

What’s the book about?

Duende is about Jason’s mental adventure in Spain to discover the world of flamenco. He originally sets off to learn the flamenco guitar but gets a whole lot more than he bargained for (I know the feeling, my plan was to come to Seville for a year, that was nine years ago).

Jason admits in his prologue that for years he lived in Italy because he wanted to be in Spain. After his Italian girlfriend dumps him, a drunken busker makes him see the uselessness of his degree, and his university lecturer suggests looking into a life as an academic, he realises he should follow his dream, head to Spain and learn the flamenco guitar.

I was surprised that his adventure starts in Alicante, not the most popular destination for flamenco, but he knows Pedro, a friend of a friend, who takes him out for his first live flamenco performance where he first feels duende. That’s when he sees Lola, a flamenco dancer, who he bumps into again once he gets a job teaching English. Through Lola he meets various musicians and also finds Juan, who becomes his first flamenco guitar teacher. Over time his relationship with Lola becomes passionate and they have a steamy affair. The problem is that Lola’s husband, Vincente, is Jason’s boss. When Jason feels that Vincente might have a sneaky suspicion about the affair he escapes to Madrid, where he meets Jesús, a crazy gypsy, and the real flamenco adventure begins. I’ll let you find out what happens next.

Duende in Madrid

Duende in Madrid.
Photo by nclawler

Apart from the fact that Jason is a witty and descriptive writer, I love his enthusiasm for life. The way he takes risks by going abroad on his own in search of a better life and curiosity for learning about the flamenco world is inspiring. I can relate to his desire to explore and learn about Spain and respect the way he manages to emerge himself deep into the world of flamenco. His passion for learning a difficult instrument is also uplifting. One of the reasons I came to Spain was to learn the guitar, but I never really had the skill, so his passion impressed me.

I also like the characters he meets, especially Pedro, his witty first friend, and the mental Jesús who gets up to all sorts of madness. Lola is just how I imagine passionate flamenco dancers to be as well.

I also learnt a lot about flamenco. The different types of palos guitarist’s play, interesting historical facts about the origins of flamenco, lots of references to the big names in flamenco, and also how difficult it is to become a half-decent flamenco guitarist.

Would I recommend it?

Definitely! If you have a slight interest in flamenco, or even in what it’s like to live in Spain, then this is a great choice. Jason adds interesting snippets of history and facts about flamenco and Spain. His descriptions of the people he meets along the way are excellent and you really feel as if you are on the adventure with him.

Jason has also written AndalusGuerra, and Sacred Sierra, which are all on my to-read-list.

If you want to buy the book then you can get a hard copy here, or download it on your kindle here.

Have you read Duende, by Jason Webster? What did you think? Do you know any other decent books about flamenco?

6 thoughts on “Book Review: Duende, a Journey in Search of Flamenco

  1. I read ‘Duende’ a few years ago and really enjoyed it. I have also read ‘Andalus’. I think he’s a good writer.

    1. Yeah I’m actually reading it again now. I think I’ll work through his books over the next couple of months, they all look like great reads. What’s your favourite Spanish based book?

      1. I love all the Chris Stewart books 🙂 Also, there is a book I read a few years ago, it was in our school library (the book has since been unofficially ‘borrowed’ and not returned), but it was set in old Castellar, although it was given another name. I have just been searching the internet but cannot find it, was something like ‘doing the fandango’- I thought it was a cracking yarn (I presume not true…)about old hippies and drug barons…If I remember the name I’ll let you know!

        1. Hey Wendy,

          Great thanks I’ll have a look for that, sounds interesting! Just read Duende again, great book! On to his next ones now. Hope all is well.

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